Korean food with an American cut of pork

I think of pork tenderloin as a really “American cut” of pork because I can’t think of an instance where Taiwanese people would choose this cut deliberately. Its a very low fat cut, and given that most Taiwanese people only know how to stir fry with the biggest fire they can muster, this isn’t a great cut to deal with. Most of the time pork belly is used, and even if other cuts are used fat is kept on just so that it will taste better.

However, I figured out the way to make tenderloin properly. As I have repeated before, cooking it to medium rare is key. Yes yes, the USDA tells you to cook it to 160F, and blah blah blah, but seriously, 160F is pushing it. 140F is what you should be going for, even if you want to stir fry something. So I made Daeiji Bulgogi with pork tenderloin, and it tastes great. =)

Also, I find Korean food to be very addictive. I think its the heavy flavors, the sweet and spicy really get to me. I think the best part, though, is that its hard to mess up with Korean food. Whenever I make it, it always tastes good.

Recipe from Maangchi.

Ingredients:

  • 1 sliced medium onion, 3 chopped green onions
  • 4 cloves of minced garlic, ½ ts minced ginger
  • 1 chopped green chili pepper (optional)
  • 1/3 cup hot pepper paste
  • 2 tbs hot pepper flakes
  • 2 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs soy sauce
  • ½ ts black ground pepper
  • 2 ts of sesame oil
  • ~2lbs pork tenderloin

Procedure:

  1. Put all the ingredients except the pork into a large wok/pot/pan whatever you have. Since there are a lot of ingredients, I put it into a big (3 or 6qt I’m not sure) pot.

    All but the pork

  2. Cut the tenderloin into 1 inch cubes. Larger is preferable, since you don’t want the meat to cook too fast.

    BIG CUBES I SAY

  3. Heat your cooking utensil over high heat, and allow the onions to cook till translucent.
  4. Move the meat into the pot, and, using a timer, go for 3-5 minutes of cooking time depending on the size of your cubes. NO MORE THAN THAT. I’m telling you. Trust me on this one. It tastes awesome if you don’t let the meat overcook. You want the centers to still be pink when you’re done.

A bowl of tastiness

Super easy entree, and it tastes great too. =D

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2 thoughts on “Korean food with an American cut of pork

  1. Christine says:

    I’ve never really tried Korean food — where I live, it all gets overwhelmed with butter chicken and sushi! Kimchi is great, though… the throat-burning stuff is where it’s at, so I’m all down with the heat in this recipe. ;)

    • Yeahh, I love spicy food. =) Where you’re at, no need to try Korean food! Ahhh all the dim sum and other amazing Asian eats, you won’t miss the Korean food. Pittsburgh is ridiculously white, except for the influx of college kids during the school year, so I really try to avoid Asian food. Unless I really crave it of course, then its all good, haha.

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